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Inguinal Hyperhidrosis: Case Report of an Uncommon Cause of Vaginitis

  • Krista J. Childress
    Correspondence
    Address correspondence to: Krista J. Childress, MD, Emory University School of Medicine, Division of Gynecologic Specialties, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Children's Healthcare of Atlanta, Divisions of Pediatric Surgery and Pediatrics, 1975 Century Blvd Suite 6, Atlanta, GA 30309; Phone (404) 785-8787
    Affiliations
    Division of Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas
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  • Oluwateniola Brown
    Affiliations
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Northwestern University School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois
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  • Jennifer Bercaw-Pratt
    Affiliations
    Division of Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas
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Published:February 05, 2018DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpag.2018.01.008

      Abstract

      Background

      Hyperhidrosis (excessive sweating) affects 1%-3% of the population. Primary focal hyperhidrosis most commonly affects the axilla, palms, and soles. There are few case reports of hyperhidrosis of the genital region, typically described as inguinal hyperhidrosis or Hexsel's hyperhidrosis.

      Case

      A 17-year-old girl presented with 3 years of copious, clear “vaginal” discharge causing significant emotional distress. After extensive gynecologic and urologic workup was negative, further review of her history was notable for excessive axillary sweating. Inguinal hyperhidrosis was suspected and she was treated with topical aluminum chloride hexahydrate with complete resolution of her symptoms.

      Summary and Conclusions

      Inguinal hyperhidrosis, compared with other sites, is not widely described in the literature. Awareness of inguinal hyperhidrosis is important because it causes significant social embarrassment but is a treatable condition.

      Key Words

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